Not a game of quid pro quo!

A rift of a certain kind between the two Houses – the National Assembly (NA) and National Council (NC) – was apparent since the first Parliament. However, it has only ballooned now, perhaps rampant with the two Houses at loggerhead on almost every trivial issue deliberated in the Parliament. pixx

Take for instance the deliberation on the pay revision. The Lower House endorsed the pay revision despite NC’s recommendation to defer the revision until the economy improves. And while NA has the prerogative on this matter, perhaps it would be befitting to take into consideration the recommendations from NC as well. As such, the whole time and resources that NC spent deliberating and coming out with the recommendations, therefore, become futile if their recommendations were to be simply ignored.

Similarly, NC’s refusal to not deliberate on the Right to Information (RTI) Bill puts to waste the time and resources that NA took to deliberate on the Bill. NC simply rejected the Bill citing that there wasn’t much time to discuss the issues in the Bill. A whole year would, therefore, be wasted if RTI Bill becomes a Dead Bill.

Although debate and discourse are ideal for a fruitful democracy, but it would be, therefore, wrong if the two Houses are entangled in constant disagreements all the time. It will only make law making process more cumbersome. If what NC recommends is rejected by NA, and vise versa, when will be able to enact laws?

The extreme positioning by the two Houses, with both towing the line of in the national interest, is only going to be a problem. Where do we build consensus? Should there be a mechanism where differences are sorted out even outside the Parliament? Or is it just about some sort of a power displaying game or a quest to exhibit the mightier of the two?

It would be wrong if NA rejecting recommendations from NC is a mere retaliation of NC having refused to take up or review Bills for deliberation. Similarly, it even applies to NC – it would be wrong if NC considers showing supremacy or authority the next time when the NA sends a bill for review.

It’s simply not a game of quid pro quo. The least NA and NC members should realize is look at the larger interest of the nation. They have been voted by the people; chosen hoping that they would strive for the interest of the people, their community and nation, and not to lock horns every time on trivial matter. Instead of serving the larger interest of the nation, their present doing is disservice to the nation.

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